How to see the version of Oracle Linux

Determine Oracle Linux version Oracle Linux is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. At first, it may be confusing to determine what specific operating system is running. This is because both have the /etc/redhat-release file. If that file exists, use the cat command to display the contents. Next step is to determine if there is a /etc/oracle-release file as well. If so, then you can be sure that Oracle Linux is running. cat /etc/oracle-release Sample output might be: Oracle Linux Server release […]

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Linux Security Guide (extended version)

Linux Security Guide (extended version) With so many articles about Linux security on the internet, you may feel overwhelmed by how to properly secure your Linux systems. With this guide, we walk through different steps, tools, and resources. The main goal is to have you make an educated choice on what security defenses to implement on Linux. For this reason, this article won’t show any specific configuration values, as it would implicate a possible best value. Instead, related articles and […]

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Discover to which package a file belongs to

Determine the package a file belongs do Sometimes you want to know the related package of a file, before installation, or when it is already there. This is of great help during system hardening or general system cleanups. In this article we have a look at several ways to determine the relationships between files and the package they belong to. CentOS, Fedora, RHEL Show files per installed package To show what files are in a package, use the rpm command. rpm -ql […]

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Grep command examples and usage tips

Grep The grep command is one of the oldest tools for Linux and other platforms. Actually, it is much older than Linux, as is written by Ken Thompson more than 40 years ago. The name grep stands for “globally regular expression print”. This name comes from its predecessor ed and the specific mode in which you would globally search, using a regular expression, and print the output. The related command was “g/re/p”. Enough history, let’s dig through some grep examples, to maximize […]

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How to solve an expired key (KEYEXPIRED) with apt

Updating expired keys on Debian and Ubuntu Software updates and package management is easy with systems based on Debian or Ubuntu. Just apt-get update (or apt update) and run an upgrade. But sometimes you may encounter the following situation: a KEYEXPIRED message. root# apt-get update && apt-get upgrade Get:1 http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-security InRelease [94.5 kB] Hit:2 http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial InRelease Get:3 http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-updates InRelease [95.7 kB] Hit:4 http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-backports InRelease Hit:5 https://packages.cisofy.com/community/lynis/deb stable InRelease Get:6 http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 Packages [373 kB] Ign:7 […]

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Troubleshooting Linux Time Synchronization with NTP

Time Synchronization The network time protocol helps computer systems to synchronize their time. We know this protocol by its shorter name NTP. In the past, it was not really a big issue if your system was a few minutes off. This changed with the interconnected world we are now living in. One of the better examples is networks relying on the authentication protocol Kerberos. If your system time is not correct, you may not be able to authenticate. This is because […]

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Mosh, the SSH Alternative Option for System Administration

Reasons to use Mosh instead of SSH Mosh, or mobile shell, is the ideal tool for remote system administration. While SSH is great, Mosh beats it in several areas. Let’s dive into the reasons why it makes sense to learn about Mosh. Pros Session Resumption Remember the last time your connection was interrupted? It it frustrating and sometimes even leads to losing some of your work. The stable TCP connection is not always a blessing. Mosh comes to the rescue, especially […]

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Automatic Security Updates with DNF

Automatic Security Updates The Dandified YUM tool, DNF, has become a powerful package manager for systems running Fedora. One of the great options is that security patches easily requested. This allows us for automatically security patching of our systems. Let’s explore the options and see how dnf-automatic can help us with fully automated patching. Security Patches The newer versions of Fedora use DNF. To check available security patches, use the dnf command. dnf updateinfo list security While this output is […]

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